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Impacts and Implications of Tribal Conflicts in Walter SCOTT’s Ivanhoe: A Critical Analysis (By Idelphonse Maoklo ATEHIHO)

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Impacts and Implications of Tribal Conflicts in Walter SCOTT’s Ivanhoe: A Critical Analysis



By  Idelphonse Maoklo ATEHIHO

Master

Description

Impacts and Implications of Tribal Conflicts in Walter SCOTT’s Ivanhoe: A Critical Analysis

By  Idelphonse Maoklo ATEHIHO

Master

Abstract

Racism is a mode of social classification that determines who is who, who deserves what, who properly belongs where and does what; as such it is inalienably linked to power. This situation usually leads to racial segregation that can be defined as the practice of keeping ethnic, racial, religious, or gender groups separate, especially by enforcing the use of separate schools, transport, housing, and other facilities, and usually discriminating against a minority group.

The England depicted in the novel “Ivanhoe” is divided. There is strife between the Normans and Saxons, and English and Jews. The Normans conquered England in the eleventh century following the famous Battle of Hastings in 1066. The Saxons are the defeated race. Far from showing the differences between Normans and Saxons in the twelfth century, the novel in fact reflects English nineteenth century views about English and French. The Normans, with the absence of King Richard Plantagenet, dispossess the Saxons, oppress them, make them abandon their properties, their lands and live in forests. This abuse of power makes the defeated people take revenge.

The English character is reflected in the earthly good nature of Cedric and the uprightness and courage of Locksley Robin Hood. The English view of the French character is shown in the Normans, with their high-flown language of chivalry and honor, concepts which are shown to be hypocritical. What the Saxon English bring to the nation is a gift for decency and order, as is shown in Chapter 32, when the Locksley and his men show their mastery of the principles of good government. But the Norman values also have their place. King Richard, after all, is a Norman, and he shows he has the required values of leadership and justice.

He participates to the revenge of Saxons against the Normans for Justice and Reconciliation. Wilfred of Ivanhoe, a Saxon and the key figure, has chosen to enter the service of Richard, learn all the arts of chivalry and go off to the Crusades. He therefore represents the best of both cultures and is a model for the future unity of England.

Despite the kindness and beauty of Rebecca, there is no hope for the Jews to become part of the national fabric after the reconciliation of both Normans and Saxons.

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